Field Mouse – Hold Still Life

Album, Music, Reviews August 11, 2014

Originally published and still available at The Girls Are (11/07/14).

Field MouseHold Still Life, Topshelf Records

Brookyln’s Field Mouse discard the connotations associated with the tiny, timid creature their name represents by creating an album which shows no sign of meekness, as they continue to build their sound from their love of the notoriously noisy My Bloody Valentine and other cohorts of shoegaze.

Hold Still Life builds on the lucid dreams of prior releases ‘You Guys Are Gonna Wake Up My Mom’ and the saccharine sweetness of ‘How Do You Know.’ This nostalgic balance is illustrated in new track ‘Tomorrow is Yesterday’ which eagerly nods to the more tasteful side of ’90′s Brit rock, as does the upbeat and soundtrack worthy ‘Everyone But You’. A warm tide of pop sentimentality washes over  ‘Reina’ and The Cure-esque ‘Netsuke’ and we are remindedthe allure of a killer guitar hook is far more irresistibly appeal

Field MouseHold Still Life, Topshelf Records

Brookyln’s Field Mouse discard the connotations associated with the tiny, timid creature their name represents by creating an album which shows no sign of meekness, as they continue to build their sound from their love of the notoriously noisy My Bloody Valentine and other cohorts of shoegaze.

Hold Still Life builds on the lucid dreams of prior releases ‘You Guys Are Gonna Wake Up My Mom’ and the saccharine sweetness of ‘How Do You Know.’ This nostalgic balance is illustrated in new track ‘Tomorrow is Yesterday’ which eagerly nods to the more tasteful side of ’90′s Brit rock, as does the upbeat and soundtrack worthy ‘Everyone But You’. A warm tide of pop sentimentality washes over  ‘Reina’ and The Cure-esque ‘Netsuke’ and we are remindedthe allure of a killer guitar hook is far more irresistibly appealing.

‘Everyone But You’ is imbued with a sense of minor melodrama that comes with the introspection of oneself in the midst of new responsibilities, relationship pressures and the future unknown. The subtle, delicate and emotive ‘Two Ships’ offers a different side to the band, opposing the rigor at the start of the album. Laced with synths and a rumbling bassline, the song avoids masking vocalist Rachel Browne’s delicate whispersOf similar ilk, ‘Asteroid’ meanders between both sounds of fragility and a stomping, impending doom.

Hold Still Life is the reflection of Field Mouse’s own experiences with the limbo between youth and pending adulthood, exploring adolescence in an emphatic and vulnerable manner. Its swift change in tempo and quick transitioning between soft-pop and indie-rock illustrate the band’s familiarity with that fast-paced frenzy we call life, and all the uncertainty that comes with it.

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